Skip to Content

News & Alerts

Health Alert

Required Vaccinations to Attend School in NYC

News Item

The First Days of School: A Workshop for Families

The first days of school bring a mix of excitement and anxiety. Join Tom and Eileen to talk about how to prepare your child for their Open House School experience. Learn to set realistic expectations and “tried and true” tips for easing the transition to school.

Thursday, September 7th at 6:30.

News Item

Welcome All!

Welcome old and new friends to Open House.

Health Alert

Strep Throat reported in the Rays and Seastars

What Is Strep Throat?
Strep throat is a bacterial infection that causes inflammation and pain in the throat. This common condition is caused by group A Streptococcus bacteria. Strep throat can affect children and adults of all ages. However, it’s especially common in children between the ages of 5 and 15. Sneezing and coughing can spread the infection from one person to another.

Symptoms of Strep Throat
The severity of strep throat can vary from person-to-person. Some people experience mild symptoms like a sore throat, whereas other people have more severe symptoms including fever and difficulty swallowing. The common symptoms of strep throat include:
a sudden fever, especially if it’s 101˚F or higher
a sore, red throat with white patches
a headache
chills
a loss of appetite
swollen lymph nodes in the neck
trouble swallowing

The symptoms of strep throat typically develop within five days of exposure to the bacteria.
When to See Your Doctor
Not all sore throats are a result of a strep infection. Other illnesses can cause a sore throat, too.

This includes: the common cold, a sinus infection, postnasal drip and acid reflux.

Sore throats caused by other medical conditions usually improve on their own with or without treatment in a few days.
Call your doctor if you experience:
a sore throat that lasts longer than two days
a sore throat with white patches
dark, red splotches or spots on the tonsils or the top of the mouth
a sore throat with a fine, sandpaper-like pink rash on the skin
difficulty breathing
difficulty swallowing

Diagnosing Strep Throat
If you complain of a persistent sore throat, your doctor will examine your throat and check for signs of inflammation. Your doctor may also check your neck for swollen lymph nodes and ask about other symptoms. If your doctor suspects you have strep throat, they may do a rapid strep test in the office.
This test determines whether your sore throat is caused by a strep infection or another type of bacteria or germ. Your doctor swabs the back of your throat with a long cotton swab, collecting a sample. Your doctor will then send the sample to the lab to look for signs of bacteria.
Results are available in about five minutes. If your rapid strep test is negative but your doctor thinks that you have strep throat, they can send your sample to an outside lab for additional testing. These results are available within a few days.

Treating Strep Throat
Antibiotics
If you’re diagnosed with strep throat, your doctor will prescribe an antibiotic to treat the infection. These medications inhibit the spread of bacteria and infections. Several types of antibiotics are available. However, penicillin and amoxicillin are the most common medications given for a strep infection.

It’s important that you finish your antibiotic treatment course to kill the infection completely. Some people stop taking their medication when symptoms improve, which can trigger a relapse. If this happens, the symptoms can return.

At-Home Care
In addition to antibiotics, there are at-home treatments to improve the symptoms of strep throat. These remedies include:
drinking warm liquids, such as lemon water and tea
drinking cold liquids to help numb the throat
turning on a cool-mist humidifier
taking over-the-counter pain relievers, such as ibuprofen or acetaminophen
sucking on throat lozenges
adding 1/2 teaspoon of salt to 1 cup of water and gargling the mixture

Outlook and Potential Complications of Strep Throat
If strep throat is treated, the symptoms will improve within one week. But if it’s left untreated, serious complications. These complications include:
an ear infection
sinusitis
rheumatic fever, which is an inflammatory disease that affects the joints, the heart, and the skin
post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis, which is an inflammation of the kidneys
mastoiditis, which is an infection of the mastoid bone in the skull
scarlet fever, which occurs when toxins created by the strep infection cause a scarlet-colored rash to develop on different parts of the body guttate psoriasis, which is a condition that causes small, red teardrop-shaped spots to appear on the body
peritonsillar abscess, which is a pus-filled infection that develops in the back of the tonsils
To reduce your risk of complications, contact your doctor if your strep throat symptoms don’t improve within 48 hours of taking an antibiotic. They may need to prescribe a different antibiotic to fight the infection.

References: Mayo Clinic Staff. (2015, December 16). Strep throat. Retrieved from http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/strep-throat/symptoms-causes/dxc-20165964

News Item

Summer Program

Our Summer Program is in full swing. We still have room here and there if you would like your child to join the fun.

News Item

Our Spring Fling was a success!

Thanks to all for helping Open House raise $15,000. The party was fun. There were good drinks, good music and good company. Everyone’s thumbs had a work out bidding up items. Be sure to collect your winnings from the front desk.

News Item

Spring Fling Donation Form

Auction Donation Form

Health Alert

Strep Throat: Garden, Savannah & River Rooms

What Is Strep Throat?
Strep throat is a bacterial infection that causes inflammation and pain in the throat. This common condition is caused by group A Streptococcus bacteria. Strep throat can affect children and adults of all ages. However, it’s especially common in children between the ages of 5 and 15. Sneezing and coughing can spread the infection from one person to another.

Symptoms of Strep Throat
The severity of strep throat can vary from person-to-person. Some people experience mild symptoms like a sore throat, whereas other people have more severe symptoms including fever and difficulty swallowing. The common symptoms of strep throat include:
a sudden fever, especially if it’s 101˚F or higher
a sore, red throat with white patches
a headache
chills
a loss of appetite
swollen lymph nodes in the neck
trouble swallowing

The symptoms of strep throat typically develop within five days of exposure to the bacteria.
When to See Your Doctor
Not all sore throats are a result of a strep infection. Other illnesses can cause a sore throat, too.

This includes: the common cold, a sinus infection, postnasal drip and acid reflux.

Sore throats caused by other medical conditions usually improve on their own with or without treatment in a few days.
Call your doctor if you experience:
a sore throat that lasts longer than two days
a sore throat with white patches
dark, red splotches or spots on the tonsils or the top of the mouth
a sore throat with a fine, sandpaper-like pink rash on the skin
difficulty breathing
difficulty swallowing

Diagnosing Strep Throat
If you complain of a persistent sore throat, your doctor will examine your throat and check for signs of inflammation. Your doctor may also check your neck for swollen lymph nodes and ask about other symptoms. If your doctor suspects you have strep throat, they may do a rapid strep test in the office.
This test determines whether your sore throat is caused by a strep infection or another type of bacteria or germ. Your doctor swabs the back of your throat with a long cotton swab, collecting a sample. Your doctor will then send the sample to the lab to look for signs of bacteria.
Results are available in about five minutes. If your rapid strep test is negative but your doctor thinks that you have strep throat, they can send your sample to an outside lab for additional testing. These results are available within a few days.

Treating Strep Throat
Antibiotics
If you’re diagnosed with strep throat, your doctor will prescribe an antibiotic to treat the infection. These medications inhibit the spread of bacteria and infections. Several types of antibiotics are available. However, penicillin and amoxicillin are the most common medications given for a strep infection.

It’s important that you finish your antibiotic treatment course to kill the infection completely. Some people stop taking their medication when symptoms improve, which can trigger a relapse. If this happens, the symptoms can return.

At-Home Care
In addition to antibiotics, there are at-home treatments to improve the symptoms of strep throat. These remedies include:
drinking warm liquids, such as lemon water and tea
drinking cold liquids to help numb the throat
turning on a cool-mist humidifier
taking over-the-counter pain relievers, such as ibuprofen or acetaminophen
sucking on throat lozenges
adding 1/2 teaspoon of salt to 1 cup of water and gargling the mixture

Outlook and Potential Complications of Strep Throat
If strep throat is treated, the symptoms will improve within one week. But if it’s left untreated, serious complications. These complications include:
an ear infection
sinusitis
rheumatic fever, which is an inflammatory disease that affects the joints, the heart, and the skin
post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis, which is an inflammation of the kidneys
mastoiditis, which is an infection of the mastoid bone in the skull
scarlet fever, which occurs when toxins created by the strep infection cause a scarlet-colored rash to develop on different parts of the body guttate psoriasis, which is a condition that causes small, red teardrop-shaped spots to appear on the body
peritonsillar abscess, which is a pus-filled infection that develops in the back of the tonsils
To reduce your risk of complications, contact your doctor if your strep throat symptoms don’t improve within 48 hours of taking an antibiotic. They may need to prescribe a different antibiotic to fight the infection.

References: Mayo Clinic Staff. (2015, December 16). Strep throat. Retrieved from http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/strep-throat/symptoms-causes/dxc-20165964

News Item

Snow Day on March 14, 2017

THE VERY SNOWY DAY

Time to get the sleds out of the closet or basement! With a blizzard on the way, the Department of Education has announced public schools will be closed Tuesday, March 14th.  As it is our policy to follow the Department of Education’s lead, Open House will be closed tomorrow.

We anticipate school will be open on Wednesday, March 15th however, please check the website for updates. The OHNS Board meeting will be rescheduled.

Keep safe and warm,

Eileen, Tom and Carey

Health Alert

Pond Room: Head Lice

There has been a case of head lice in the Pond Room. We are busy checking all the children . With your permission we will spray your child with a homeopathic preventative we purchased from fairytaleshiarcare.com. Inspect your child every day for the next few weeks. Treatments are not always 100% effective; please do not rely on them exclusively. There are professionals Lice consultants (Lice Busters -718 360 1830 and Abigail Rosenfeld-718 435-2592). It is possible to take care of lice yourself, if you are able to make the time commitment. Many organic treatment products are available from www.fairytaleshaircare.com. Please read the info provided on our website Go to For Parents then Helpful Links. Head lice are common and can happen to anyone, no matter how clean and well cared for they are! Sorry to give you extra work. Feel free to stop by if you have any questions.