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Pond Room: Coxsackie

New York State Department of Health Last Reviewed: October 2011
Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease (Coxsackie viral infection)

What is hand, foot and mouth disease?

Hand, foot and mouth disease is a viral infection caused by a strain of Coxsackie virus. It causes a blister-like rash that, as the name implies, involves the hands, feet and mouth. (Hand, foot and mouth disease is different than foot-and-mouth disease, which is an infection of cattle, pigs, sheep, goats and deer and is caused by a different virus.)

Who gets hand, foot and mouth disease?

The infection usually occurs in children under 10 years of age, but occasionally can occur in young adults.

How is it spread?

The virus is spread by direct contact with nose and throat discharges, blisters and feces of infected people.

What are the symptoms and when do they start?

Symptoms of fever, poor appetite, runny nose and sore throat can appear three to five days after exposure. A blister-like rash on the hands, feet and in the mouth usually develops one to two days after the initial symptoms.

When and how long can someone spread the disease?

A person is contagious when the first symptoms appear and may continue until the blister-like skin lesions disappear. The virus has been known to be shed in the stool for up to several weeks.

How is hand, foot and mouth disease diagnosed?

The diagnosis is generally suspected on the appearance of blister-like rash on hands and feet and mouth in a child with a mild febrile illness. Although specific viral tests are available to confirm the diagnosis, they are rarely performed due to expense and length of time needed to complete the tests.

Does a prior infection with Coxsackie virus make a person immune?

Specific immunity can occur, but a second episode is possible from a different strain of Coxsackie virus.

What is the treatment?

There is no specific treatment. Treatment is aimed at fever control and maintaining good oral hydration

Can there be complications associated with hand, foot and mouth disease?

The illness is typically mild, complications are rare. More serious infections have been seen recently with a certain strain of Coxsackie viral infection in Indonesia

What can be done to prevent the spread of this disease?

Children who feel ill or have a fever should be excluded from group settings until the fever is gone and the child feels well. Thorough hand washing and care with diaper changing practices is important as well.

Is there a risk for pregnant women?

There is debate as to any congenital disorders related to Coxsackie viral infections and pregnancy. Pregnant women should consult their obstetrician for further

Health Alert

The Flu: A Guide for Parents

The NYS Department of Health has issued this important notice.https://www.health.ny.gov/publications/2423/

Health Alert

The Garden Room: Strep Throat

A case of Strep Throat was reported in the Garden Room on Wednesday October 4th

What Is Strep Throat?
Strep throat is a bacterial infection that causes inflammation and pain in the throat. This common condition is caused by group A Streptococcus bacteria. Strep throat can affect children and adults of all ages. However, it’s especially common in children between the ages of 5 and 15. Sneezing and coughing can spread the infection from one person to another.

  • Symptoms of Strep Throat
    The severity of strep throat can vary from person-to-person. Some people experience mild symptoms like a sore throat, whereas other people have more severe symptoms including fever and difficulty swallowing. The common symptoms of strep throat include:
    a sudden fever, especially if it’s 101˚F or higher
    a sore, red throat with white patches
    a headache
    chills
    a loss of appetite
    swollen lymph nodes in the neck
    trouble swallowing

The symptoms of strep throat typically develop within five days of exposure to the bacteria.

  • When to See Your Doctor
    Not all sore throats are a result of a strep infection. Other illnesses can cause a sore throat, too. This includes: the common cold, a sinus infection, postnasal drip and acid reflux. Sore throats caused by other medical conditions usually improve on their own with or without treatment in a few days.
    Call your doctor if you experience:
    a sore throat that lasts longer than two days
    a sore throat with white patches
    dark, red splotches or spots on the tonsils or the top of the mouth
    a sore throat with a fine, sandpaper-like pink rash on the skin
    difficulty breathing
    difficulty swallowing
  • Diagnosing Strep Throat
    If you complain of a persistent sore throat, your doctor will examine your throat and check for signs of inflammation. Your doctor may also check your neck for swollen lymph nodes and ask about other symptoms. If your doctor suspects you have strep throat, they may do a rapid strep test in the office. This test determines whether your sore throat is caused by a strep infection or another type of bacteria or germ. Your doctor swabs the back of your throat with a long cotton swab, collecting a sample. Your doctor will then send the sample to the lab to look for signs of bacteria.Results are available in about five minutes. If your rapid strep test is negative but your doctor thinks that you have strep throat, they can send your sample to an outside lab for additional testing. These results are available within a few days.
  • Treating Strep Throat Antibiotics: If you’re diagnosed with strep throat, your doctor will prescribe an antibiotic to treat the infection. These medications inhibit the spread of bacteria and infections. Several types of antibiotics are available. However, penicillin and amoxicillin are the most common medications given for a strep infection.It’s important that you finish your antibiotic treatment course to kill the infection completely. Some people stop taking their medication when symptoms improve, which can trigger a relapse. If this happens, the symptoms can return.
  • At-Home Care
    In addition to antibiotics, there are at-home treatments to improve the symptoms of strep throat. These remedies include:
    drinking warm liquids, such as lemon water and tea
    drinking cold liquids to help numb the throat
    turning on a cool-mist humidifier
    taking over-the-counter pain relievers, such as ibuprofen or acetaminophen
    sucking on throat lozenges
    adding 1/2 teaspoon of salt to 1 cup of water and gargling the mixture
  • Outlook and Potential Complications of Strep Throat If strep throat is treated, the symptoms will improve within one week. But if it’s left untreated, serious complications. These complications include:
  • an ear infection
  • sinusitis
  • rheumatic fever, which is an inflammatory disease that affects the joints, the heart, and the skin
  • post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis, which is an inflammation of the kidneysmastoiditis, which is an infection of the mastoid bone in the skull
  • scarlet fever, which occurs when toxins created by the strep infection cause a scarlet-colored rash to develop on different parts of the body guttate psoriasis, which is a condition that causes small, red teardrop-shaped spots to appear on the body
  • peritonsillar abscess, which is a pus-filled infection that develops in the back of the tonsils

To reduce your risk of complications, contact your doctor if your strep throat symptoms don’t improve within 48 hours of taking an antibiotic. They may need to prescribe a different antibiotic to fight the infection.

References: Mayo Clinic Staff. (2015, December 16). Strep throat. Retrieved from http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/strep-throat/symptoms-causes/dxc-20165964

Health Alert

Required Vaccinations to Attend School in NYC

Health Alert

Strep Throat reported in the Rays and Seastars

What Is Strep Throat?
Strep throat is a bacterial infection that causes inflammation and pain in the throat. This common condition is caused by group A Streptococcus bacteria. Strep throat can affect children and adults of all ages. However, it’s especially common in children between the ages of 5 and 15. Sneezing and coughing can spread the infection from one person to another.

Symptoms of Strep Throat
The severity of strep throat can vary from person-to-person. Some people experience mild symptoms like a sore throat, whereas other people have more severe symptoms including fever and difficulty swallowing. The common symptoms of strep throat include:
a sudden fever, especially if it’s 101˚F or higher
a sore, red throat with white patches
a headache
chills
a loss of appetite
swollen lymph nodes in the neck
trouble swallowing

The symptoms of strep throat typically develop within five days of exposure to the bacteria.
When to See Your Doctor
Not all sore throats are a result of a strep infection. Other illnesses can cause a sore throat, too.

This includes: the common cold, a sinus infection, postnasal drip and acid reflux.

Sore throats caused by other medical conditions usually improve on their own with or without treatment in a few days.
Call your doctor if you experience:
a sore throat that lasts longer than two days
a sore throat with white patches
dark, red splotches or spots on the tonsils or the top of the mouth
a sore throat with a fine, sandpaper-like pink rash on the skin
difficulty breathing
difficulty swallowing

Diagnosing Strep Throat
If you complain of a persistent sore throat, your doctor will examine your throat and check for signs of inflammation. Your doctor may also check your neck for swollen lymph nodes and ask about other symptoms. If your doctor suspects you have strep throat, they may do a rapid strep test in the office.
This test determines whether your sore throat is caused by a strep infection or another type of bacteria or germ. Your doctor swabs the back of your throat with a long cotton swab, collecting a sample. Your doctor will then send the sample to the lab to look for signs of bacteria.
Results are available in about five minutes. If your rapid strep test is negative but your doctor thinks that you have strep throat, they can send your sample to an outside lab for additional testing. These results are available within a few days.

Treating Strep Throat
Antibiotics
If you’re diagnosed with strep throat, your doctor will prescribe an antibiotic to treat the infection. These medications inhibit the spread of bacteria and infections. Several types of antibiotics are available. However, penicillin and amoxicillin are the most common medications given for a strep infection.

It’s important that you finish your antibiotic treatment course to kill the infection completely. Some people stop taking their medication when symptoms improve, which can trigger a relapse. If this happens, the symptoms can return.

At-Home Care
In addition to antibiotics, there are at-home treatments to improve the symptoms of strep throat. These remedies include:
drinking warm liquids, such as lemon water and tea
drinking cold liquids to help numb the throat
turning on a cool-mist humidifier
taking over-the-counter pain relievers, such as ibuprofen or acetaminophen
sucking on throat lozenges
adding 1/2 teaspoon of salt to 1 cup of water and gargling the mixture

Outlook and Potential Complications of Strep Throat
If strep throat is treated, the symptoms will improve within one week. But if it’s left untreated, serious complications. These complications include:
an ear infection
sinusitis
rheumatic fever, which is an inflammatory disease that affects the joints, the heart, and the skin
post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis, which is an inflammation of the kidneys
mastoiditis, which is an infection of the mastoid bone in the skull
scarlet fever, which occurs when toxins created by the strep infection cause a scarlet-colored rash to develop on different parts of the body guttate psoriasis, which is a condition that causes small, red teardrop-shaped spots to appear on the body
peritonsillar abscess, which is a pus-filled infection that develops in the back of the tonsils
To reduce your risk of complications, contact your doctor if your strep throat symptoms don’t improve within 48 hours of taking an antibiotic. They may need to prescribe a different antibiotic to fight the infection.

References: Mayo Clinic Staff. (2015, December 16). Strep throat. Retrieved from http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/strep-throat/symptoms-causes/dxc-20165964

Health Alert

Strep Throat: Garden, Savannah & River Rooms

What Is Strep Throat?
Strep throat is a bacterial infection that causes inflammation and pain in the throat. This common condition is caused by group A Streptococcus bacteria. Strep throat can affect children and adults of all ages. However, it’s especially common in children between the ages of 5 and 15. Sneezing and coughing can spread the infection from one person to another.

Symptoms of Strep Throat
The severity of strep throat can vary from person-to-person. Some people experience mild symptoms like a sore throat, whereas other people have more severe symptoms including fever and difficulty swallowing. The common symptoms of strep throat include:
a sudden fever, especially if it’s 101˚F or higher
a sore, red throat with white patches
a headache
chills
a loss of appetite
swollen lymph nodes in the neck
trouble swallowing

The symptoms of strep throat typically develop within five days of exposure to the bacteria.
When to See Your Doctor
Not all sore throats are a result of a strep infection. Other illnesses can cause a sore throat, too.

This includes: the common cold, a sinus infection, postnasal drip and acid reflux.

Sore throats caused by other medical conditions usually improve on their own with or without treatment in a few days.
Call your doctor if you experience:
a sore throat that lasts longer than two days
a sore throat with white patches
dark, red splotches or spots on the tonsils or the top of the mouth
a sore throat with a fine, sandpaper-like pink rash on the skin
difficulty breathing
difficulty swallowing

Diagnosing Strep Throat
If you complain of a persistent sore throat, your doctor will examine your throat and check for signs of inflammation. Your doctor may also check your neck for swollen lymph nodes and ask about other symptoms. If your doctor suspects you have strep throat, they may do a rapid strep test in the office.
This test determines whether your sore throat is caused by a strep infection or another type of bacteria or germ. Your doctor swabs the back of your throat with a long cotton swab, collecting a sample. Your doctor will then send the sample to the lab to look for signs of bacteria.
Results are available in about five minutes. If your rapid strep test is negative but your doctor thinks that you have strep throat, they can send your sample to an outside lab for additional testing. These results are available within a few days.

Treating Strep Throat
Antibiotics
If you’re diagnosed with strep throat, your doctor will prescribe an antibiotic to treat the infection. These medications inhibit the spread of bacteria and infections. Several types of antibiotics are available. However, penicillin and amoxicillin are the most common medications given for a strep infection.

It’s important that you finish your antibiotic treatment course to kill the infection completely. Some people stop taking their medication when symptoms improve, which can trigger a relapse. If this happens, the symptoms can return.

At-Home Care
In addition to antibiotics, there are at-home treatments to improve the symptoms of strep throat. These remedies include:
drinking warm liquids, such as lemon water and tea
drinking cold liquids to help numb the throat
turning on a cool-mist humidifier
taking over-the-counter pain relievers, such as ibuprofen or acetaminophen
sucking on throat lozenges
adding 1/2 teaspoon of salt to 1 cup of water and gargling the mixture

Outlook and Potential Complications of Strep Throat
If strep throat is treated, the symptoms will improve within one week. But if it’s left untreated, serious complications. These complications include:
an ear infection
sinusitis
rheumatic fever, which is an inflammatory disease that affects the joints, the heart, and the skin
post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis, which is an inflammation of the kidneys
mastoiditis, which is an infection of the mastoid bone in the skull
scarlet fever, which occurs when toxins created by the strep infection cause a scarlet-colored rash to develop on different parts of the body guttate psoriasis, which is a condition that causes small, red teardrop-shaped spots to appear on the body
peritonsillar abscess, which is a pus-filled infection that develops in the back of the tonsils
To reduce your risk of complications, contact your doctor if your strep throat symptoms don’t improve within 48 hours of taking an antibiotic. They may need to prescribe a different antibiotic to fight the infection.

References: Mayo Clinic Staff. (2015, December 16). Strep throat. Retrieved from http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/strep-throat/symptoms-causes/dxc-20165964

Health Alert

Pond Room: Head Lice

There has been a case of head lice in the Pond Room. We are busy checking all the children . With your permission we will spray your child with a homeopathic preventative we purchased from fairytaleshiarcare.com. Inspect your child every day for the next few weeks. Treatments are not always 100% effective; please do not rely on them exclusively. There are professionals Lice consultants (Lice Busters -718 360 1830 and Abigail Rosenfeld-718 435-2592). It is possible to take care of lice yourself, if you are able to make the time commitment. Many organic treatment products are available from www.fairytaleshaircare.com. Please read the info provided on our website Go to For Parents then Helpful Links. Head lice are common and can happen to anyone, no matter how clean and well cared for they are! Sorry to give you extra work. Feel free to stop by if you have any questions.

Health Alert

Garden Room: Strep Throat

What Is Strep Throat?
Strep throat is a bacterial infection that causes inflammation and pain in the throat. This common condition is caused by group A Streptococcus bacteria. Strep throat can affect children and adults of all ages. However, it’s especially common in children between the ages of 5 and 15. Sneezing and coughing can spread the infection from one person to another.

Symptoms of Strep Throat
The severity of strep throat can vary from person-to-person. Some people experience mild symptoms like a sore throat, whereas other people have more severe symptoms including fever and difficulty swallowing. The common symptoms of strep throat include:
a sudden fever, especially if it’s 101˚F or higher
a sore, red throat with white patches
a headache
chills
a loss of appetite
swollen lymph nodes in the neck
trouble swallowing

The symptoms of strep throat typically develop within five days of exposure to the bacteria.
When to See Your Doctor
Not all sore throats are a result of a strep infection. Other illnesses can cause a sore throat, too. This includes:
the common cold
a sinus infection
postnasal drip
acid reflux
Sore throats caused by other medical conditions usually improve on their own with or without treatment in a few days.
Call your doctor if you experience:
a sore throat that lasts longer than two days
a sore throat with white patches
dark, red splotches or spots on the tonsils or the top of the mouth
a sore throat with a fine, sandpaper-like pink rash on the skin
difficulty breathing
difficulty swallowing

Diagnosing Strep Throat
If you complain of a persistent sore throat, your doctor will examine your throat and check for signs of inflammation. Your doctor may also check your neck for swollen lymph nodes and ask about other symptoms. If your doctor suspects you have strep throat, they may do a rapid strep test in the office.
This test determines whether your sore throat is caused by a strep infection or another type of bacteria or germ. Your doctor swabs the back of your throat with a long cotton swab, collecting a sample. Your doctor will then send the sample to the lab to look for signs of bacteria.
Results are available in about five minutes. If your rapid strep test is negative but your doctor thinks that you have strep throat, they can send your sample to an outside lab for additional testing. These results are available within a few days.

Treating Strep Throat
Antibiotics
If you’re diagnosed with strep throat, your doctor will prescribe an antibiotic to treat the infection. These medications inhibit the spread of bacteria and infections. Several types of antibiotics are available. However, penicillin and amoxicillin are the most common medications given for a strep infection.

It’s important that you finish your antibiotic treatment course to kill the infection completely. Some people stop taking their medication when symptoms improve, which can trigger a relapse. If this happens, the symptoms can return.

At-Home Care
In addition to antibiotics, there are at-home treatments to improve the symptoms of strep throat. These remedies include:
drinking warm liquids, such as lemon water and tea
drinking cold liquids to help numb the throat
turning on a cool-mist humidifier
taking over-the-counter pain relievers, such as ibuprofen or acetaminophen
sucking on throat lozenges
adding 1/2 teaspoon of salt to 1 cup of water and gargling the mixture

Outlook and Potential Complications of Strep Throat
If strep throat is treated, the symptoms will improve within one week. But if it’s left untreated, serious complications. These complications include:
an ear infection
sinusitis
rheumatic fever, which is an inflammatory disease that affects the joints, the heart, and the skin
post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis, which is an inflammation of the kidneys
mastoiditis, which is an infection of the mastoid bone in the skull
scarlet fever, which occurs when toxins created by the strep infection cause a scarlet-colored rash to develop on different parts of the body guttate psoriasis, which is a condition that causes small, red teardrop-shaped spots to appear on the body
peritonsillar abscess, which is a pus-filled infection that develops in the back of the tonsils
To reduce your risk of complications, contact your doctor if your strep throat symptoms don’t improve within 48 hours of taking an antibiotic. They may need to prescribe a different antibiotic to fight the infection.

References: Mayo Clinic Staff. (2015, December 16). Strep throat. Retrieved from http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/strep-throat/symptoms-causes/dxc-20165964

Health Alert

Meadow Room: Tummy Troubles

Viral Gastroenteritis (stomach flu)
This unpleasant stomach “bug” has caused many Meadow Room children to be out sick today. Recovery requires rest, hydration and a bland diet for a few day. Feel better friends.

Health Alert

Savannah Room: Tummy Troubles

Viral Gastroenteritis (stomach flu)
This unpleasant stomach “bug” has been bugging some children. Most recover in a day or two with rest, hydration and a bland diet.